Hi Tech Samurai Banners - Part 2

Mounting the banners on the central intake location was covered in Pt 1, because it's centralized it's probably the most balanced looking option for a single banner however you may find that you want one of the banners mounted to one side. Perhaps you want to have a shoulder or jet pack mounted weapon which might look cluttered so close to the banner where an off set banner might be preferred. Or you might want to mount a pair of banners with one on each side.

Referring back to the photo with cutting guide lines you will want to use the left-most line as your guide. You only want to remove the triangle shaped section (not other portions of the engine) So you don't want to cut any deeper than the cylinder.

 

 

 

On the left is an unmodified example, the one on the right has been trimmed so that the face is now flat and will now pair up with an upright banner. As mentionedpx;" /> 

 

 

 

Same model shown from the front


  


 

For a truly epic looking Commander or Bodyguard model you can repeat the process on both sides giving the model a second banner.

 

 

 

There's two different sets of profile angles to consider for this conversion, the first and most noticeable is that each of the banners slightly lean out from the center (when viewed from the front) This gives them a slight "V" shape and mimics wings, it also broadens the profile slightly which helps the model appear more imposing. The second set of angles is where one of the banners is tilteded ever so slightly forward to mirror the torso's lean and implied movement. You can see it a bit easier in the side view. It's only about a 3-5 degree differance between how the two support poles are positioned but it adds a lot to the profile. Again it's always a good idea to play around with the part positions using sticky tac before the final mounting. 

This particular configuration was inspired by the card art for Doji Kuwanan from the Legend of the Five Rings CCG, it's a fantasy style samurai piece I've always loved as it it just screams imposing badass. At a future point I'll be adding a pair of the armored shoulder pads to this model to further bulk out the profile and give it a more prominant delta shape to the torso and shoulders. 

 


 

 


As you may have noticed there are also infantry sized banners available in our webstore, these are even easier to add to models as they don't require any significant amounts of cutting. When mounting the banners on one of the older style firearriors there's two really good spots on the back pack for attaching a banner. The first is a flat space that's on the left-hand side, which easily accepts an upright banner. The second spot is the box like protrusion in the center of the backback. A banner can be glued to it giving it a slight rearwards lean. If you want it mounted more upright in the center of the backpack all you need to do is trim off the box and mounts the banner in it's place. Like the banners on the crisis suits experimenting with a forward/rearwards tilt or lean to the side can really impact the dynamic sense of movement that the model creates. 

The support poles on these are pretty tiny, so they work best with resin or plastic models. They can be mounted on metal models but if so they will need to be handled with a little bit of extra care, the weight of the metal models can break the support pole if it tips over on accident or is handled roughly. It won't be as much of an issue with light weight plastic/resin and they should hold up fine for gameplay although handling them with care will always be helpful pre-caution for any model. 

 




The support poles on these are pretty tiny, so they work best with resin or plastic models. They can be mounted on metal models but if so they will need to be handled with a little bit of extra care, the weight of the metal models can break the support pole if it tips over on accident or is handled roughly. It won't be as much of an issue with light weight plastic/resin and they should hold up fine for gameplay although handling them with care will always be helpful pre-caution for any model. 

 





 

 

Don't be afraid to try your own conversions, take the time to enjoy the modeling process and start creating your own jaw dropping models. Thanks for reading, and we'll be posting more modeling and conversion articles shortly.